Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
phones are being monitored by the national security agency. that's according to a "the washington post" according to edward snowden. the spy agency says it does not collect data from phones in the u.s. >> the rescuers are holding out little hope for whales stranded in the ever glades. 4 dozen short-finned pilot whales swam into the shallows. six died. vets youthanized four more. a wealthy neighbourhood in louisiana wants to form its own city. we have more from baton rouge. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren at baton rouge. >> they are not in school, but he knows education will be the key to a better life. >> i want them to go to school and learn what they can. >> it's a challenge in a city where 60% of the students are not learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems. how many generations of children do you disserve before you try sag different. >> lionel rainy is part of a group pushing for a different plan. the city of st george would encompass an area home to a quarter of the residents. if would control and run its own schools with tax re
. >> the u.s. national security agency is gathering billions of records from mobile phones worldwide according to leaked top secret documents given to the paper by former edward snowden. the report says 5 bill yop records every 24 hours allows u.s. intelligence officials to track the movement of people in ways that were unimaginable. using tools such as code traveller, which can map relationships geographically with people and their most. american people say it is legal. it's a breach of privacy. let's discuss it with the ceo of spark digital, a digital marketing and social media company. to know the n.s.a. is spying on people using their mobile phones, sure that is no surprise. what is interesting about that to you. >> what is interesting is what they are tracking. date, time, speed, trajectory. that's what they are keeping historical records of. what is a lot of people don't know is they are not just looking at it just at this moment, but backwards in time when the phone came online. >> code traveller, meaning they can work out which group of people from in proximity to each other.
the national security agency basically patrolling all the cell phones in the world basically. a lot of young people point to privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more like seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom. by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, they spend so much time texting and instagrami instagraming. something is coming up every single day. and so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyberspace. now, the challenge is, first of all, we do have people trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. if we're going to do a good job preventing a terror attack, a weapon of mass destruction getting on to the new york subway system, et cetera
the story about the national security agency basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically. a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments for people signing up, they want to keep their privacy. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare, people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issues a broader issue. young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and so i am. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming. >> whatever. >> something's coming up every single day. so all of us spend more and more of o
're trying to eliminate. >> when you saw the story about the national security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like to be part of anything collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up, they want to keep their privacy? >> health care is entirely different. it's similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government, it's protected, it's governed by a whole series of law. nsa is a broader issue and, you're right, young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and, you know -- >> whatever. >> something is coming up ever
security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments to people wanting to sign up? they want to keep their privacy? >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend mo
the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. that's why we talk to the opposition all the time. >> reporter: as first reported by the "wall street journal" the u.s. and gulf nations are engaging with islamist groups in order to strengthen those who are not directly linked to the al qaeda franchises in syria. while these groups including the newly organized islamic front are not members of al qaeda, they still fly the black flag and support the establishment of an islamic state within syria, which runs counter to democratic principles. as for the syrian president assad, who's agreed to send a delegation to january peace talks in geneva, switzerland, d
spilling in russia the japanese parliament that diet recently pasta that is setup to see us signed national security council it's a sixty member government launched its job is to coordinate all the ministries and other agencies are involved in japan's foreign and defense offense. the headquarters of the steel industry would be installed within the cabinet secretary. intel and the is a tenuous peace off two days of anti government protests for the first time the minute readers of the country have spoken they see the political situation is returning to normal slowly but surely often days of violent protests and eighty sheets though the press today he says been drilled out the possibility of any kind of cool warning to mention ministry saying the ministry forces would not take a beating know in what is an evolving political situation the bottom was a protest is when you get a rally of the national police headquarters in bangkok to force their way through the gates of the silent right to the protest leader us a pep talks about says the fight is going to go on despite efforts to defuse the crisi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)